In the Tableau community worldwide, Tableau Public should be one of the most popular sites for Tableau users. Tableau users can publish their Tableau Desktop projects to this website at any time, and many amazing projects can be discovered there.

 

However, be careful when you are building a project solely for Tableau Public use from your Tableau Desktop. Until this day, there are still some problems with Tableau Public that it cannot show (and sometimes purposefully bans) Tableau Desktop functions, which may cause a crash of your dashboard on Tableau Public.

 

I created a Star Wars Dashboard recently and tried to publish it to Tableau Public; below are two major issues that happened to my dashboard.

 

Font

I usually use common fonts, but this time I wanted to be creative and picked a font called ‘Jedi’. In Tableau Desktop, the font fits into the theme of my dashboard, but when I thought this wouldn’t be a problem for Tableau Public, I was wrong. All fonts I used turned into ‘Times New Roman’ (see screenshot below). I thought Tableau Public, after so many years, had included all its fonts, but no, it is still a bit behind Tableau Desktop regarding formatting.

 

 

 

Link Actions

In this dashboard, I also implemented some Link Actions, which is, when hovering my mouse over a planet name, the planet image will appear on my dashboard. However, Tableau Public disabled all these URLs embedded in my dashboard for very good security reasons – Tableau Public does not want visitors to risk clicking external URLs which the website cannot verify. As a result, it disables lots of URL functions.

 

Final Suggestion

If you plan to publish projects to Tableau Public, remember ‘Keep It Simple’. It will save you lots of time, so you don’t have to fix the issues with Tableau Public and enjoy more time working on the project itself.

 

 

 

 

Luke Yin
Author: Luke Yin

Before joining the Data School, Luke was a PhD researcher studying urban history of global cities at the University of Melbourne. Previously, Luke worked as an internal accountant for a Melbourne local winery. When conducting urban research, Luke discovered his passion for data visualisation and analysis through a number of university-based digital projects. Later, this became the reason for him to join the Data School. Luke wants to combine his expertise in research and business with data analysis to help solve real-world problems.