Today I had the opportunity to critique and update the dashboard that started my journey in data analytics. This was my original dashboard from my first Data School application, A History of the NBA’s MVP. In this blog I will be taking you through the steps I took to update and improve my very first dashboard.

 

Step 1: Remove unnecessary text

In my initial dashboard, for every section, I wrote some text explaining what was happening within the data. I decided to remove all of the unnecessary text and only keep the “fun facts”. This was to not overload the viewer with lots of text, and instead let them explore the data and find those insights themselves. Find screenshots of the changes below:

Before:

 

After:

 

Step 2: Fix any colour inconsistencies

The colours in my first dashboard were extremely inconsistent. I had the same colour palette for different charts. In one chart green was for the SG position, but on the next chart, the same green was for the age range 30-32. To fix this issue, I removed the colouring from the age range chart and made it blue to remain consistent with the rest of the dashboard. I left the colours for the positions the same to avoid any confusion as to what different colours meant.

Before: 

 

After:

 

Step 3: Add in parameters to allow more data exploration

When I first created the dashboard, I created a scatterplot that allowed users to look at the correlation of total points vs points per game, as well as rebounds and assists. This only allowed users to look at those 2 fields and not compare them against anything else. So I created a parameter that allows users to compare the different statistical categories (points, assists, rebounds, height, and weight). I also initially created a line chart per statistical category, so I created a parameter so there’s just one line chart and the user can change the category themselves.

Before: 

 

After: 

 

This dashboard is still imperfect, but these changes have improved the readability and functionality of this dashboard drastically. You can view both the dashboards and all my other dashboards on my Tableau public

The Data School
Author: The Data School